Department of Physics and Astronomy

University of Mississippi

Dr. Lucien Cremaldi

Photo of Dr. Cremaldi

Office: 108 Lewis Hall
Email: cremaldi@phy.olemiss.edu
Phone: (662) 915-5311

Degrees Earned

  • M.N.S., 1975, Louisiana State University
  • Ph.D., 1983, Northwestern University

Experience

  • Research Associate, University of Colorado, 1983-88
  • Visiting Researcher, Fermilab, 1978-
  • Assistant Professor, University of Mississippi, 1988-94
  • Associate Professor, University of Mississippi, 1994-2001
  • Professor, University of Mississippi, 2001-present

Memberships

  • American Physical Society
  • American Association of Physics Teachers.
  • IEEE

Research Interests

I have been involved for many years in studying the properties of heavy quarks. In 1988 I worked with an international group of physicists at Fermilab, then the highest energy accelerator in the world, to produce some of the most precise measurements on charmed particles ever made. Many of the vertex reconstruction techniques we pioneered there are being used today. To analyze the large quantities of data, which we produced, our group successfully built and operated one of the first large parallel processing UNIX computing farms, which are commonly used in high energy physics and other fields of research these days.

In 2000 we began studying B-mesons and CP violation at the SLAC B factory BABAR experiment. Measurements from this experiment firmly associated CP violating effects with the weak phases in the CKM matrix. Many high statistics B-meson branching fractions, Dalitz plot analyses, rare decays, and measurements of CKM elements are still being performed with the data. In 2013 we began working on the Belle II experiment. At 80 times the luminosity of BABAR,  there is a great potential to discover Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics in B-meson decays.

In the 20 year lead-up to the LHC  we worked on the CMS Pixel Detector and the CMS Hadron Calorimeter. In 2009 experimentation at the Large Hadron Collider began at CERN when the first  7 TeV collisions were realized. We studied QCD jet topologies, top quarks, and h→μ μ decays.  In summer 2012 a Higgs boson was discovered at 125 GeV/c2.  The LHC is now searching for super-symmetry, which if discovered will radically change our view of the Standard Model.

Circa 2008 were built one of the first high density aerogel cerenkov counters for the MICE experiment running at the Rutherford Appleton laboratory in the UK.  The MICE experiment is a staging ground for the first cooled muon beams, which can lead to  μ μ colliders for the future and to high intensity neutrino beams to study CP violation and BSM physics in the lepton sector.