Department of Physics and Astronomy

University of Mississippi

Events

  • Sun
    20
    Jan
    2019
    9:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • January 20, 2019 on Sunday 9:00 PM - Midnight

    We plan to observe  a total eclipse of the Moon though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    29
    Jan
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Thomas Werfel
    Department of Chemical Engineering
    University of Mississippi

    Targeted Therapies at the Interface of Nanotechnology and Cancer Biology

    In the Interdisciplinary NanoBioSciences (iNBS) Lab, we work largely at the interface of nanotechnology and cancer biology. The complexity of cancer necessitates creative, multi-faceted solutions that nanotechnologies have the potential to offer. However, the successful application of nanotechnologies is currently stymied by oversimplified biological models and a dearth of data from advanced biological studies that faithfully recapitulate human disease. Ultimately, our scientific goals are to better understand nanomaterial-biological system interactions to improve the performance of nanotechnologies in humans, discover new cancer molecular targets ideal for nanotechnology-based therapies, and identify cellular and molecular processes that impact drug delivery efficiency, cancer metastasis, and resistance to therapy. In this colloquium, I will highlight three research thrusts in the iNBS Lab that span nanotechnology and targeted cancer therapy: 1) Drugging previously 'undruggable' cancer-causing genes with siRNA nanomedicines, 2) Combating the immunosuppressive impact of efferocytosis in the tumor microenvironment, and 3) Targeting the platelet-tumor cell interaction to prevent breast cancer metastasis.

  • Tue
    05
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Kyle Parfrey
    Astrophysics Division
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    The Magnetic Lives of Black Holes and Neutron Stars

    The most extreme and surprising behaviors of black holes and neutron stars are driven by their surrounding plasmas and magnetic fields. Numerical simulations which capture basic physical processes like particle acceleration, magnetic reconnection, and magneto-rotational turbulence can yield insight into such disparate phenomena as black-hole jets and X-ray coronae, magnetar giant gamma-ray flares, and the spin limit of millisecond pulsars. I will focus on what simulations can teach us about the launching of relativistic jets in compact binary mergers, and will describe how a new technique for general-relativistic plasma kinetics will aid in understanding black holes' jets and particle acceleration, and in interpreting future observations with the Earth-spanning Event Horizon Telescope.

  • Thu
    07
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Shaon Ghosh
    Department of Physics
    University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee

    Astrophysics with Synergy of Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Observations

    About three and a half years ago, the direct detection and measurement of gravitational waves from a pair of coalescing black holes by the LIGO interferometers opened a new window for astrophysicists to look into the universe. Almost two years later, the discovery of gravitational wave from a binary neutron star system marked the beginning of the era of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave astronomy. In this talk, I will present a brief history of this discovery and its importance in that context. I will then focus on the rich scientific results of the multi-messenger observation and finally, discuss how such joint observations can help us extract astrophysical information from some of the most extreme objects in the universe. Specifically, I will highlight how observations of neutron stars can help us understand how matter behaves in conditions that cannot be replicated in earth-based laboratories. The required information for such studies comes to us from various avenues of astrophysical observations. I will delineate the methods that we will be employing in combining these information to make robust inferences on the neutron star equation of state.

  • Sun
    10
    Feb
    2019
    6:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • February 10, 2019 on Sunday 6:00 -8:00 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, Mars and Uranus, nebulae and star clusters though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    12
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Stephen Taylor
    Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy
    California Institute of Technology

    Frontiers of Multi-Messenger Black-Hole Physics

    The bounty of gravitational-wave observations from LIGO and Virgo has opened up a new window onto the warped Universe, as well as a pathway to addressing many of the contemporary challenges of fundamental physics. I will discuss how catalogs of stellar-mass compact object mergers can probe the unknown physical processes of binary stellar evolution, and how these systems can be harnessed as standard distance markers (calibrated entirely by fundamental physics) to map the expansion history of the cosmos. The next gravitational-wave frontier will be opened within 3-6 years by pulsar-timing arrays, which have unique access to black-holes at the billion to ten-billion solar mass scale. The accretionary dynamics of supermassive black-hole binaries should yield several tell-tale signatures observable in upcoming synoptic time-domain surveys, as well as gravitational-wave signatures measurable by pulsar timing. Additionally, pulsar-timing arrays are currently placing compelling constraints on modified gravity theories, cosmic strings, and ultralight scalar-field dark matter. I will review my work on these challenges, as well as in the exciting broader arena of gravitational-wave astrophysics, and describe my vision for the next decade of discovery.

  • Thu
    14
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    David Nichols
    Institute of Physics
    University of Amsterdam

    Gravitational Waves and Fundamental Properties of Matter and Spacetime

    Gravitational waves from the mergers of ten binary black holes and one binary neutron star were detected in the first two observing runs by the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. In this talk, I will discuss the eleven gravitational-wave detections and the electromagnetic observations that accompanied the neutron-star merger. These detections confirmed many of the predictions of general relativity, and they initiated the observational study of strongly curved, dynamical spacetimes and their highly luminous gravitational waves. One aspect of these high gravitational-wave luminosities that LIGO and Virgo will be able to measure is the gravitational-wave memory effect: a lasting change in the gravitational-wave strain produced by energy radiated in gravitational waves. I will describe how this effect is related to symmetries and conserved quantities of spacetime, how the memory effect can be measured with LIGO and Virgo, and how new types of memory effects have been recently predicted. I will conclude by discussing the plans for the next generation of gravitational-wave detectors after LIGO and Virgo and the scientific capabilities of these new detectors. These facilities could detect millions of black-hole and neutron-star mergers per year, and they can provide insights on a range of topics from the population of short gamma-ray bursts to the presence of dark matter around black holes.

  • Tue
    19
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Sarah Vigeland
    Department of Physics
    University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee

    Probing Massive and Supermassive Black Holes with Gravitational Waves

    Observations have shown that nearly all galaxies harbor massive or supermassive black holes at their centers. Gravitational wave (GW) observations of these black holes will shed light on their growth and evolution, and the merger histories of galaxies. Massive and supermassive black holes are also ideal laboratories for studying strong-field gravity. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are sensitive to GWs with frequencies ~1-100 nHz, and can detect GWs emitted by supermassive black hole binaries, which form when two galaxies merge. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned space-based GW detector that will be sensitive to GWs ~1-100 mHz, and it will see a variety of sources, including merging massive black hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspires (EMRIs), which consist of a small compact object falling into a massive black hole. I will discuss source modeling and detection techniques for LISA and PTAs, as well as present limits on nanohertz GWs from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration.

  • Tue
    19
    Feb
    2019
    6:00 pmUptown Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Erin Calipari,
    Department of Pharmacology,
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

    The Neuroscience of Addiction

    We are currently in the middle of an opioid epidemic. Thus, understanding the behavioral and neurobiological factors that drive drug addiction is urgent and critical to public health. One of the most important aspects of drug addiction is the active decision to seek out and take the drug, most often at the expense of other rewards or in the face of negative consequences. Normally, organisms use information in their environment to make decisions that maximize positive – and minimize negative – outcomes. However, addicted individuals value taking drugs above all other outcomes, an effect that drives their decision- making strategies. By using animal models that allow animals to “self-administer” drugs we can determine which cells in the brain are controlling their decision to take the drug and then silence or activate these neurons to change the way that animals are behaving in their environment. By combining complex behavioral models with tools that allow us to record and manipulate different cells and circuits in the brain in awake and behaving animals we can determine how these cells help animals make decisions and develop pharmacological tools to promote abstinence and prevent relapse in addicted individuals.

     

    See this page for details.

  • Thu
    21
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Anuradha Gupta
    Department of Physics
    Pennsylvania State University

    Physics and Astrophysics with Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescences

    The recent detections of gravitational waves from several binary black holes and binary neutron star mergers have opened up new avenues for gravitational wave astronomy and astrophysics. These detections provide us with great opportunities to study astrophysical sources in both weak and strong gravity regimes. In this presentation, I'll tell you how one does physics and astrophysics with gravitational waves emitted from compact binary coalescences. In particular, how to constrain binary formation mechanisms from their observed properties, how to test general relativity and other theories of gravity and lastly how to do precision cosmology with gravitational waves. I'll also touch upon the future prospects of these efforts.

  • Wed
    27
    Feb
    2019
    12:00 pmLewis Hall 104

    Mukunda Acharya
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Mukunda Acharya will discuss the article entitled "Three-dimensional Features of Sound Channel Axis in the Global Ocean"

    Dr. Jake Bennet
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Dr. Bennet will host a discussion session to share the Job Interview Experience. The main goal of this discussion is to provide some basic guidelines for the graduate students who step to the job market after the graduation.

  • Thu
    28
    Feb
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Libo Jiang
    Department of Physics & Astronomy
    University of Pittsburgh

    MicroBooNE - Using Neutrinos to Probe Nuclear Physics for the Future

    MicroBooNE is a large 170-ton liquid-argon-Time Projection Chamber Neutrino experiment located on the Booster neutrino beamline at Fermilab. The detector serves as a next step in a phased program towards the construction of massive kiloton scale LArTPC detectors for future long-baseline neutrino physics (DUNE) and is the first detector in the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. A major physics goals of the experiment is to probe the source of the anomalous excess of electron-like events in MiniBooNE/LSND with improved detection capabilities. In addition, MicroBooNE has an extensive cross section physics program that will improve current models on neutrino-nucleus interactions, especially nuclear effects in argon, and decrease systematic errors in the oscillation program. This colloquium introduces the detector & performance of MicroBooNE and summarizes the status of MicroBooNE's neutrino cross section analyses.

  • Mon
    04
    Mar
    2019
    4:00 pmNCPA Auditorium

    Jonathan Eisch
    Department of Physics & Astronomy
    Iowa State University

    Reviving the Poltergeist: Bringing Water-Based Neutrino Experiments into the Precision Era with Efficient Neutron Detection

    Advances in water-based neutrino-detection technology are setting the stage for a new generation of detectors to answer questions about the nature of matter in the universe and to make our world a safer place. Leading the way in these new technologies is the Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) at Fermilab. ANNIE will revisit the use of neutron capturing salts, pioneered in the first experiment to detect the neutrino, to detect the number of neutrons produced in GeV-scale neutrino interactions. This measurement, the first on a neutrino beam, will help push future neutrino-oscillation experiments into the precision era by separating quasi-elastic charged-current interactions from more complicated many-body neutrino interactions and thus improving the models of neutron production in neutrino interactions. The WATCHMAN experiment, under construction in the UK, will use the same technology at a much larger scale to demonstrate the ability to remotely monitor nuclear reactors from tens of kilometers away. This demonstration will enable remote reactor monitoring to be a part of future nuclear nonproliferation treaties. In this talk, I will describe the ANNIE and WATCHMAN experiments along with their impacts on detector technology development toward future large multipurpose neutrino detectors like Theia.

  • Tue
    05
    Mar
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Gavin Davies
    Department of Physics
    Indiana University

    The Wonderful World of Neutrino Oscillations

    In 1998 it was discovered that neutrinos oscillate and have mass which led to the award of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. That discovery generated a global campaign to better understand neutrino properties using oscillations of neutrinos produced in the Sun, in the atmosphere, at reactors, and by accelerators. The community has learned much but several important questions remain such as: Which neutrino is heaviest? Do neutrinos break the symmetry between matter and antimatter? Are there more than three neutrino types?

    In my talk, I will introduce neutrinos and the questions surrounding them, their chameleon-like flavor-changing behavior, and the experiments that hunt for them including the leading-edge, international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment.

  • Wed
    06
    Mar
    2019
    12:00 pmLewis Hall 104

    Kevin Lin
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Kevin Lin will host a workshop on COMSOL Multiphysics - A Finite Element Software

    A message from Kevin: "COMSOL has become an essential simulation package that is widely used in both the industry and academia research. I'll first introduce the basic and tricks of COMSOL, and then I'll show some case studies I've done in Dr. Mobley's Ultrasonic group. We currently looking for grads to join our group. This will also be a good chance to get to know the variety of projects we do."

  • Thu
    07
    Mar
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Jingbo Wang
    Department of Physics
    University of California — Davis

    Exploring the Neutrino Physics with the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    One of the biggest surprises in particle physics is that the neutrinos have mass, which was discovered by the neutrino oscillation experiments. This fundamental property of neutrinos leads to some new questions. What is the ordering of the neutrino mass states? Do the neutrinos violate the matter/antimatter symmetry? What characteristics does the neutrino mixing matrix have? The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will address these questions with the high-precision Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) technology. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of neutrino oscillations, then describe DUNE and its physics programs. I will also talk about the Pulsed Neutron Source as a newly proposed calibration technique for liquid argon TPCs. The precision measurements of the neutrinos will open a window to new physics beyond the standard model. The future and prospects will be discussed.

  • Sun
    17
    Mar
    2019
    7:30 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • March 17, 2019 on Sunday 7:30 - 9:00 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, Mars and Uranus, nebulae and star clusters though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    19
    Mar
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Xiaobo Chao
    National Center for Computational Hydroscience and Engineering
    University of Mississippi

    Three Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Temperature Distribution in a High Dam Reservoir with the Effect of Channel Curvature on Mekong River

    A three dimensional numerical model has been developed to simulate the flow circulation as well as temperature distribution in a high dam reservoir with the effect of channel curvature. In the model, the density induced buoyant force on the turbulent flow is considered. This “buoyancy-extended version of k-ε model” is used for turbulence closure, and the flow velocity and temperature distribution are simulated simultaneously. The model was first validated using a laboratory case of turbulent buoyant flow in a curved open channel. The secondary flow circulation in the curved channel was simulated and the temperature distribution in the channel was validated using experimental data. The model was then applied to simulate the flow and temperature distribution in Xiaowan Reservoir, a high dam reservoir on Mekong River, with deep water depth and curvature affect. The numerical results are generally in good agreement with field observations. The thermal stratification, temperature distribution in the reservoir and the effect of channel curvature on the temperature distribution are discussed.

  • Tue
    19
    Mar
    2019
    6:00 pmUptown Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Ryan C. Fortenberry,
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,
    University of Mississippi

    The Alien Molecules of Space

    Molecules float around everywhere even in the “vacuum” of space. These same little tiny pieces of everything that make up our bodies, our planet, and the air we breathe are actually also floating around between planets, around stars, and even are spread in between galaxies. Some of these molecules are familiar to us like water, methanol, and carbon dioxide. However, some are strange like protonated N2, the wing-shaped C3H2, individual salt molecules, and even one with a noble gas atom in ArH+. Some even might be the building blocks of molecules which could go on to make up our muscles, cells, and DNA. These molecules both foreign and familiar are lurking in the depths of space even when we think nothing is there. This talk will describe what molecules are present in space, how they have been detected, and what that means for us here on Earth.

    Dr. Nikki Reinemann
    Department of Chemical Engineering
    University of Mississippi

    Molecular Motors: Driving Life at the Nanoscale

    Molecules and their actions are the basis of life. Even our seemingly large-scale movements, such as walking or breathing, are powered by tiny protein machines known as molecular motors. Motor proteins are powered by a chemical fuel called ATP, just as our cars are powered by gasoline. The fuel allows the motor to make structural changes that facilitate movement within the cell and the body. The motors can transport essential cargo in the body, power cell translocation, drive cell division, and when combined together, allow organisms to move. Defects in these proteins are the basis of many diseases. At the same time, due to their essential nature, molecular motors are also drug targets to stop cancerous cell growth. Research in the Reinemann lab focuses on understanding the behavior of motor proteins at the single molecule and cellular system level using a method called optical trapping. This talk will describe specific functions of molecular motor proteins in life and disease, their behavior on the nanoscale, and methods to study them as single molecules.

     

    See this page for details.

  • Wed
    20
    Mar
    2019
    12:00 pmLewis Hall 104

    Dr. Luca Bombelli
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Our speaker, Dr. Bombelli will host a valuable workshop on SCIENTIFIC WRITING.
    Dr. Bombelli is willing to discuss the basic guidelines which are useful to write more impact full manuscripts, technical reports and dissertation. And also he will address some scientific writing tools like Latex.

     

  • Sat
    23
    Mar
    2019
    9:50 amHilbun Hall, Mississippi State University

    4th UM-MSU Joint Physics Research Symposium

    The Mississippi State PGSA is pleased to announce the 4th UM-MSU Research Symposium, to take place on March 23, 2019. This event will bring together undergraduate and graduate students from Mississippi State University (MSU) and University of Mississippi (UM) in order to promote the interaction and exchange of ideas between the participants.

    The Symposium will consist of both Oral and Poster presentations. Both presentation styles are available to all participants. This event is open to Graduate students, Undergraduate students, post-docs and other staff, as well as faculty affiliated with either UM or MSU. Topics will be based on all areas of physics which are available at either institution, including AMO, Nuclear, Theoretical/Computational, Condenses Matter, Acoustics, and more.

  • Tue
    02
    Apr
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Jason Fry
    Department of Physics
    University of Virginia

    Precision Fundamental Symmetry Measurements With Cold Neutrons

    The neutron can be used as a powerful tool to study a wide range of phenomena through many disciplines of physics. In particular, cold neutrons are utilized in condensed matter, nuclear, and particle physics with deep connections to cosmology. The free neutron has a slightly larger mass than the proton leading to far reaching implications. How long a free neutron lives determines how the light elements formed in the early universe. The kinematics of neutron decay give us insight into how quarks mix in the weak interaction. Additionally, as a neutral particle, neutrons can penetrate deeply into nucleons to further our understanding of how the strong and weak interaction mix at the smallest scales. In this talk, I will discuss the neutron physics experiments carried out and planned on the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Lab. The NPDGamma experiment, the first experiment on the FNPB, studied the most fundamental process in the Hadronic Weak Interaction (HWI) and the results set the best constraint for future investigation of the HWI. Currently we are commissioning the Nab experiment on FNPB which will make precise measurements of the electron neutrino correlation parameter "a" and the Fierz interference term "b" in unpolarized neutron beta decay. These results will lead to a new, precise, independent determination of the ratio λ = GA/GV that will sensitively test CKM unitarity.

  • Wed
    03
    Apr
    2019
    12:00 pmLewis Hall 104

    Anil Panta
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Grid Computing at Belle II

    The Belle II detector at the SuperKEKB accelerator, an asymmetric e+e- collider in Tsukuba, Japan, are major upgrades of the Belle detector and KEKB accelerator. The goal for the SuperKEKB accelerator is to reach an instantaneous luminosity of 8 × 1035 cm−2 s−1 , about 40 times the world-record peak luminosity of KEKB. At its peak, the Belle II detector will see a data rate of about 1.8 GB/s. The ultimate goal of the experiment is to collect a data sample of 50/ab, which corresponds to a data size on the order of a few hundred PB. In order to cope with the ever increasing data sample, Belle II has adopted grid based computing, as opposed to centralized computing at KEK alone for Belle. I will introduce the grid structure with its functionality and the software framework for distributed computing at Belle II.

     

    Huu Do
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: is that Electron’s Quark?

    This talk, I present a counter-intuitive and bizarre phenomenon: fractional quantum Hall effect. This effect is resulted in the  correlation between electrons in the two dimensional (2D) system creating a new quasiparticle with its charge smaller than electron one. First, I will describe the long history of classical Hall effect - integer quantum Hall effect - fractional quantum Hall effect in the  phenomenological point of view. I will briefly show the conditions for and how they could measure quantum Hall effects that are recognized as two Nobel prizes by Klaus von Klitzing (1985), and Robert B. Laughlin, Horst L. Stommer, and Daniel C. Tsui (1998). Second, one of the most interesting idea for me is the distinguish properties of quantum 2D electron system (“featureless liquid”) from classical one (“charged electron gas”). Lastly, I will introduce about the concept of composite particles that include electrons and quantum flux particles (generated by the magnetic field in two-dimensional electron system), and the intrinsic transition between fermion-boson-fermion occured in the fractional quantum Hall effect. The contents of my presentation is summarized in the publication at the Review Modern Physics journal: “Nobel Lecture: the fractional quantum Hall effect” by Horst L. Stormer.

     

  • Tue
    09
    Apr
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Glenn M. Walker
    Department of Electrical Engineering
    University of Mississippi

    Microfluidics: Thinking Small to Improve Biological Research

    Microfluidics is the study of fluid behavior at micrometer length scales and the development of devices that leverage microscale fluid phenomena. A major focus of the field has been on solving problems in biology since biological cells typically range in size from 1–20 micrometers and are difficult to manipulate with traditional instruments. Researchers have been able to exploit the manipulation of fluid volumes down to the picoliter to enable biological experiments that were previously impossible. This talk will cover some of the microscale phenomena that become dominant at micrometer lengths and also show examples of enabling biological experiments. Research from our lab on high throughput screening and cancer cell hypoxia will also be presented.

  • Wed
    10
    Apr
    2019
    12:00 pmLewis Hall 104

    Dr. Likun Zhang
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Low-gravity Fluid Dynamics and NASA Mission, and a NASA Fellowship Opportunity for Graduate Students

    Opportunities to work in Dr. Zhang's group on research relevant to NASA will be discussed.

     

  • Sun
    14
    Apr
    2019
    8:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • April 14, 2019 on Sunday 8 - 10 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, nebulae and star clusters though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    16
    Apr
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Saeed Kamali
    Department of Physics and Astronoimy
    University of Mississippi

    New Physics in Inclusive B → Xc τ ντ Decays in Light of R(D*) Measurements

     

    Kevin Lin
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Development of Vibrational Metrics for Internal Damage Scenarios of a Scaled Transnuclear-32 Dry Storage Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    The assessment of the internal structural integrity of dry storage casks for used high burnup nuclear fuel assemblies is of critical importance before transporting these to permanent repositories. The large size and structural complexity of the Transnuclear-32 (TN-32) cask as well as the inability to access its interior make this a challenging task. To address these difficulties, we use an active acoustics approach to develop metrics that are sensitive to the internal configuration of these casks. A 6:1 scaled model of the TN-32 cask was constructed in order to study internal configuration of the fuel assemblies including various damage scenarios. The vibration modes were verified in Finite Element simulations. Each mock-up fuel assembly consists of bundled steel rods, and their structural failure is mimicked by steel shot of equal weight. This talk will report the amplitude- and phase-based active acoustics metrics we developed to characterize different levels of internal damage. Our studies indicate that vibrometric signatures of various internal conditions can be measured using sources and sensors mounted on the exterior shell. Our current methodology is sensitive enough to detect structural failures at the single fuel assembly level.

     

    Robert Lirette
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Droplet Extraction and Manipulation at a Fluid Interface Using Fraxicon Modified Ultrasound

    Ultrasound focused at a fluid-fluid boundary creates an acoustic radiation pressure on the boundary that is dependent on the incident energy density and the relative density and sound speed of each fluid. For different fluid combinations this radiation pressure can either be positive or negative. For this study ultrasound propagating from water to carbon tetrachloride was used to create a negative radiation pressure at the interface. This fluid combination is impedance matched eliminating reflections and heating effects at the boundary. A fraxicon phase plate lens is a low profile analog of an axicon and generates an approximate Bessel beam in the far field. The near field exhibits a complex diffraction pattern including shadow zones capable of acoustic trapping. Starting with a planar interface, we demonstrate the extraction, capture, and manipulation of a carbon tetrachloride droplet. The negative radiation pressure draws the carbon tetrachloride surface up into the water, eventually breaking a droplet free. The trapped droplet is then transported through the water by moving the transducer.

  • Wed
    17
    Apr
    2019
    12:00 pmLewis Hall 104

    Dr. Kevin Beach
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    GitHub Workshop - Managing Shared Physics Projects with Git

    Originally developed by Linus Torvalds to organize the development of the Linux kernel, git has become a popular tool for version control and collaboration. Unlike comparable tools (e.g., subversion), it doesn't rely on a central repository or require that participants lock files during editing. Instead, the files are distributed, with each editor working from her own copy of the repository and having
    responsibility for merging changes when conflicts arise.

    Even for a single author working alone (no collaboration), git can help by tracking file changes and keeping files up-to-date across multiple computers. This is useful if you want to roll back to earlier versions of a project. And it's very convenient if you split your time between work and home computers.

    Git is quite efficient. Changes are stored as diffs (differences between adjacent versions of each file). And it is very flexible. The system is file-type agnostic, and is just as good at tracking a dissertation document as it is tracking source code. In this talk/workshop, I will show how to set up a repository and to carry out basic git operations from the command line. I will give examples of an integrated workflow
    (consistent with best practices for data provenance) that keeps source files, data, batch scripts, and manuscripts in one place.

     

  • Wed
    24
    Apr
    2019
    4:15 pmLewis Hall 109

    You are invited to attend Robert Lirette's Ph.D. dissertation defense at 4:15 PM on Wednesday, April 24 in 109 Lewis Hall.
    The dissertation title is: "Acoustic Radiation Force on a Fluid to Fluid Boundary by Phase Plate Focused Ultrasound".

  • Thu
    25
    Apr
    2019
    10:00 amLewis Hall 204

    You are invited to attend Shrobana Ghosh's Ph.D. dissertation defense at 10:00 AM on Thursday, April 25 in 204 Lewis Hall.
    The dissertation title is: "Gravitational Radiation from Superradiant Instabilities of Rotating Black Holes."

  • Thu
    25
    Apr
    2019
    2:30 pmLewis Hall 228

    You are invited to attend Sampath Bandara's Ph.D. dissertation defense at 2:30 PM on Thursday, April 25 in 228 Lewis Hall.
    The dissertation title is: “Investigation Of Narrow Bipolar Events In Mississippi Thunderstorms."

  • Tue
    30
    Apr
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Roger Waxler
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Infrasound Generation and Propagation in the Earth's Atmosphere

    The term infrasound is applied to low frequency sound in the atmosphere, generally below the limit of human hearing. The frequencies of interest in our research range from 10 Hz down to as low as 0.001 Hz, corresponding to periods of 0.1 to 1000 seconds. Such signals tend to be geophysical in nature, propagating globally and generated by large, violent events such as hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and large detonations. Their propagation depends critically on large scale temperature and wind velocity gradients. These produce a variety of acoustic ducts in the atmosphere. These are asymmetric with respect to azimuth and interact with each other. They are also spatially and temporally varying, with small scale fluctuations on top of diurnal and seasonal cycles. An overview of sources, generation and propagation of infrasound in the atmosphere will be presented.

  • Fri
    10
    May
    2019
    3:00 pmLewis Hall 109

    The 2019 induction ceremony for the National Physics Honors Society, ΣΠΣ will take place on May 10 at 3:00 PM in room 109 in Lewis Hall.

  • Sat
    11
    May
    2019
    11:30 amLewis Hall, Room 104

    You are invited to a buffet luncheon Honoring our 2019 Physics Graduates. It will take place in room 104 Lewis Hall from 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM.

  • Sun
    12
    May
    2019
    8:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • May 12, 2019 on Sunday 8 - 9:30 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, nebulae and star clusters though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Sun
    09
    Jun
    2019
    8:30 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • June 9, 2019 on Sunday 8:30 - 10:00 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, double stars, and Jupiter just before closing though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Sun
    07
    Jul
    2019
    8:30 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • July 7, 2019 on Sunday 8:30 - 10:00 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, double stars, Jupiter, and Saturn though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Sun
    11
    Aug
    2019
    8:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • August 11, 2019 on Sunday 8 - 9:30 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, nebulae and star clusters though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Sun
    11
    Aug
    2019
    8:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • August 11, 2019 on Sunday 8:00 - 9:30 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, double stars, Jupiter, and Saturn though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    03
    Sep
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya
    Department of Natural Sciences
    Lawrence Technological University

    CP Violation in the Precision Era

    Anomalies in recent data present strong hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. Several new physics models, among them vector bosons and leptoquarks, have proven to be viable candidates in light of the data. Intensity frontier experiments will soon test many of these models through precision measurements of low-energy observables. In this talk I will present a subset of recent measurements that come with a hint of new physics. I will present proposals for testing and distinguishing between some of the popular new physics models, by using CP violating observables.

  • Sun
    08
    Sep
    2019
    7:30 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • September 8, 2019 on Sunday 7:30 - 9:00 PM

    We plan to observe the Moon, double stars, Jupiter, and Saturn though our telescopes.  All these events are weather permitting. Admission is free.
    Children are welcome!

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    17
    Sep
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Department Students
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Reports on Summer Research

     

  • Tue
    17
    Sep
    2019
    6:00 pmUptown Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Jake Bennett,
    Department of Physics and Astronomy,
    University of Mississippi

    Searching for New Particles with the Belle II Detector

     

    At its heart, experimental physics is concerned with explaining the world around us through the careful acquisition and study of information. My particular field, experimental elementary particle physics, is focused on understanding the universe at its most basic level by studying the fundamental building blocks of matter. These subatomic particles interact with each other in complex and sometimes very strange ways that make a qualitative description of them rather challenging. Scientific collaborations made up of physicists and engineers from all over the world are dedicated to building massive detectors with which to study subatomic particles and their interactions. One of the most anticipated of these projects is the Belle II experiment, which started taking data last year at the KEK national accelerator facility in Tsukuba, Japan. Belle II is designed to record massive amounts of data to allow physicists to study highly suppressed reactions that may give clues to new particles and interactions beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. I will introduce some of the basic concepts of particle physics, including how we gather information, and discuss a few of its more exotic aspects.

     

    See this page for details.

  • Tue
    24
    Sep
    2019
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Carl Jensen
    Transducer Technology Group
    Bose Corporation

    Sound Reproduction and Loudspeaker Structural Modes

    Many familiar sources of sound involve vibrating structures like a piano sound board, an acoustic guitar's body, drums, and all kinds of vibrating machinery. Similarly, almost all technologies for mechanically producing sound also work by exciting some kind of vibrating structure as well, but, in sound reproduction, the goal is to recreate the original recording as accurately as possible. So the fact that all vibrating structures exhibit modal behavior can be good or bad: the diversity and excitation of modes in musical instruments lends them their unique sonic qualities and richness, but these same characteristics are very much unwanted in a loudspeaker meant for accurate reproduction. In this presentation, I'll discuss some of the principles of sound reproduction and perception as well as laying out how we can use computer simulations to untangle the complex acoustic behavior of these modes to understand their behavior and make better sounding loudspeakers.