skip to main content
Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Mississippi

Events

  • Tue
    25
    Jan
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Xinyue Gong
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Hall Effect for Acoustic Waves Carrying Angular Momentum

    Acoustic waves with a twisted wave front also carry angular momentum in addition to linear momentum,in analogy to optical and quantum fields. The law of refraction states that the direction of refracted light rays is normally in the plane of incidence as they propagate across a sharp interface. Nevertheless, the refraction law is not enough to describe the angular momentum carried by refracted beams. Refracted light beams carrying angular momentum have been observed to undergo a shift in the direction that is transverse to the plane of incidence, a phenomenon that was termed as optical Hall effect. Here we pursue the first experimental observation of Hall effects for acoustic waves that carry angular momentum. Our experiment exploits the more recently developed acoustic metasurface to manipulate the wave refraction. A theoretical calculation of the wave fields is also conducted to compare with the experimental measurements. The talk will present physics related to the phenomenon, our experimental setup, and preliminary results.

     

    Guoqin Liu
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Modeling and Simulations of Capillary-Gravity Wave Transmission Through a Surface Piercing Barrier

    Capillary-gravity waves are waves traveling on a fluid interface that are influenced by both the effects of surface tension and gravity. Interactions of capillary-gravity waves with boundaries in contact with a solid and air play an essential role in both fluid physics and fluid control techniques. Motion of the contact line at the three phase boundary (solid, liquid, and air) can influence the wave dynamics such as the wave frequency, damping, refraction, and transmission. Here we develop fluid dynamics modeling and numerical simulations to investigate the transmission of capillary-gravity waves through a surface piercing barrier under the effect of a pinned contact line. Our modeling is validated via a comparison with prior theory in ideal cases. We numerically reveal how the surface tension and contact lines affect the transmission in the realistic case for waves of different frequencies and barriers of different depths.

     

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Tue
    01
    Feb
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    M. Mahbub Alam

    Daffodil International University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
    Effects of Viscosity on Effective Dynamic Properties

    Recent theoretical and experimental findings demonstrate that as the particle concentration in a suspension increases, the effect of viscosity of the base fluid becomes more and more significant, thereby requiring to be taken into account when calculating effective properties of a suspension. Here, we employ a core-shell, self-consistent, effective medium model to derive analytical approximations for effective bulk-modulus and effective mass density for a suspension of solid elastic spheres. We incorporate the viscosity of the suspending fluid into the model through wave conversion phenomena, primarily between compressional and shear wave modes. The analytical approximations are explicit functions of particle volume fraction, dimensionless compressional and shear wave numbers, and scattering coefficients of a single sphere. The dependence of effective properties on frequency, particle size, volume fraction, and viscosity are also investigated numerically.

     

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Sun
    06
    Feb
    2022
    6:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • February 6, 2022 on Sunday 6:00 - 7:30 PM
    We’ll be looking at the Moon. The half-Moon is always great!
    Uranus is tiny and dim in the telescope.
    We’ll look at the Pleiades and the Orion nebula.
    The event is free, families are welcome. We ask visitors to have masks handy, and put them on when indoors or when many people congregate in a small area.
    Viewing is not possible when the sky is cloudy - if that happens we’ll have to cancel and ask everyone to come back in about 4 weeks for another try.

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    08
    Feb
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Suravinda Kospalage
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Study of the Decay B± → Ks0π±π0 at the Belle Experiment

    Belle is a particle physics experiment based at the KEK laboratory in Tsukuba Japan which ran from 1999 to 2010 and collected 1ab-1 of data. The Belle experiment is focused on studying the properties of particles called B mesons which are produced by accelerating and colliding electron and positron beams. These B mesons show the biggest differences between the properties of matter and anti-matter of any known particles. One of the main goals of the Belle experiments is to understand the differences between matter and anti-matter, specifically violations of charge-parity symmetry (CP violation) and how anti-matter vanished and we come to ive in a matter dominated universe.

    This project explores the charmless B decay B± → Ks0π±π0 with the Belle full Monti Carlo (full MC) simulation and Belle data corresponding to 571fb-1 of luminosity and measure the decay's branching fraction (BF). Charmless transitions can proceed by a b → u transition via a tree level diagram or b → s or d transition via the so-called penguin diagram. Both decay types are highly suppressed compared to the b → ctransition and we expect a small branching fraction, smaller than 10-5. The challenge in observing the B± → Ks0π±π0 decay is to suppress backgrounds from continuum events, which do not contain b quarks, and background from other B meson decays. Initial selections plus multi-variate analysis (MVA) machine learning/artificial intelligence technique called a boosted decision tree (BDT) used to reduce the backgrounds to the level to allow to clearly observe the decay and measure the BF.

    Additionally the Dalitz plot (DP) technique to study the intermediate resonance contributions in this decay using the Laura++ software to generate and fit toy Monte Carlo (toy MC), full Monte Carlo simulated data, and, based on the techniques developed on these simulations, the experimental data to study the resonance sub-structure of this decay.

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Tue
    15
    Feb
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Dipangkar Dutta
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    Mississippi State University

    The Incredible Shrinking Proton and the Proton Radius Puzzle

    For nearly half a century the charge radius of the proton had been obtained from measurements of the energy levels of the hydrogen atom or by scattering electrons from hydrogen atoms. Until recently the proton charge radius obtained from these two methods, agreed with one another within experimental uncertainties. In 2010 the proton charge radius was obtained for the first time by precisely measuring the energy levels of an exotic kind of hydrogen atom called muonic hydrogen. The charge radius of the proton obtained from muonic hydrogen was found to be significantly smaller than those obtained from regular hydrogen atoms. This was called the “proton charge radius puzzle” and led to a rush of experimental as well as theoretical efforts to understand whythe size of the proton appears to be different when measured in regular hydrogen vs. muonic hydrogen. Many physicists were excited by the possibility that the “puzzle” was an indication of a possible new force that acted differently on electrons and muons.

    The Proton Charge Radius (PRad) experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) was one such major new effort which used electron scattering from a regular hydrogen atom, but with several innovations that made it the highest precision electron scattering measurement. These innovative methods have allowed us to measure the size of the proton more precisely than it has been measured before using electron scattering. I will provide a brief review of the techniques used to measure the proton's size and introduce the “ proton radius puzzle”, and the world-wide effort to resolve this puzzle. I will discuss the PRad experiment, the new results from this experiment, the current status of the “puzzle” and future prospects.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Tue
    15
    Feb
    2022
    6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Maria Ann Weber
    Department of Math and Sciences,
    Delta State University

    The Secret Lives of Middle-Aged Stars

    We live with a star — the Sun! Stars have a secret life beyond what we can see with the naked eye. Some slowly fizzle out over billions of years, and some go out with a bang. Join astrophysicist Dr. Maria Weber as she discusses the lifecycle and magnetism of stars like the Sun, which are living out their middle-aged years between birth and death building intense magnetism in their deep interiors — magnetism which may impact their orbiting worlds. Find out how well we can predict the Sun’s magnetic behavior, if we should be concerned, and how our work to understand the Sun helps us better understand habitable worlds throughout the galaxy.

     

    We are in-person!

    To join virtually via Zoom:
 https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/ 99989536748

    See this page for details.

  • Tue
    22
    Feb
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Katerina Chatziioannou
    Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy
    California Institute of Technology

    Constraining the Neutron Star Equation of State with Gravitational Wave Signals

    Detections of neutron stars in binaries through gravitational waves offer a novel way to probe the properties of extremely dense matter. In this talk I will describe the properties of the signals we have observed, what they have already taught us, and what we expect to learn in the future. I will also discuss how information from gravitational waves can be combined and compared against other astrophysical and terrestrial probes of neutron star matter to unveil to the properties of the most dense material objects that we know of.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Fri
    11
    Mar
    2022
    7:45 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • March 11, 2022 on Friday 7:45 - 9:00 PM
    We’ll be looking at the Moon. The half-Moon is always great!
    Uranus is tiny and dim in the telescope.
    We’ll also look at the Pleiades and the Orion nebula.
    The event is free, families are welcome. We ask visitors to have masks handy, and put them on when indoors or when many people congregate in a small area.
    Viewing is not possible when the sky is cloudy - if that happens we’ll have to cancel and ask everyone to come back in about 4 weeks for another try.

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    22
    Mar
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Stefano Tognini
    Nuclear Energy and Fuel Cycle Division
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Celeritas: Bringing Exascale Computing to HEP Detector Simulation

    Within the next decade experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) will (mostly) finish building its next generation of particle detectors. This includes upgrades to the Large Hadron Collider and its main experiments, and completing the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). This new Era brings a myriad of challenges, many being on the computational front. As DOE consolidates its network of Leadership Computing Facilities (LCFs) with supercomputers capable of reaching Exaflops of processing power, it is fundamental to better integrate these LCFs with HEP computing workflows. In this talk I will provide an overview of computing in HEP and its many challenges, and present Celeritas, a novel GPU Monte Carlo particle transport code developed by researchers from ORNL, Fermilab, ANL, and BNL, that aims to close the gap between DOE's LCFs and HEP experiments.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Tue
    22
    Mar
    2022
    6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Dawn Wilkins
    Department of Computer & Information Science
    University of Mississippi

    Machine Learning Applications to Science: Do's and Don’ts

     

    Machine Learning is a way to add intelligence to an application without explicitly programming it with knowledge. Instead, machine learning uses examples (data) as experience and builds a model of the implicit knowledge. The advantage of this approach is the speed at which an application can be developed and deployed. Machine learning models reduce human bias in making decisions and are not limited to problems with scope manageable by humans. On the other hand, there can be issues with the application of machine learning, including obtaining enough data, implicit biases, and difficulty in the interpretability and generalizability of the models.

    We will talk about what machine learning is, how it is used, and some of the pitfalls and ethical concerns.

     

    We are in-person!

    To join virtually via Zoom:
 https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/ 99989536748

    See this page for details.

  • Thu
    24
    Mar
    2022
    6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Steven Phelps
    Department of Integrative Biology
    University of Texas – Austin

    Care: A Natural History of Intimacy

    Close social relationships are common in the animal world, and are essential aspects of the human experience. They promote collaboration and engender conflict. When do we consider a relationship a bond? This talk draws from animal behavior, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology, to explore how and why bonds form in species as diverse as prairie voles, poison frogs, and humans.

     

    We are in-person!

    To join virtually via Zoom:
 https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/ 99989536748

    See this page for details.

  • Tue
    29
    Mar
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Biswaranjan Behera
    Department of Physics
    Colorado State University

    The Search for Sterile Neutrinos with the ICARUS Detector at Fermilab

    The 476-ton active mass ICARUS T-600 liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) was a pioneering development that became the template for neutrino and rare event detectors, including the massive next generation international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. It began operation in 2010 at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories and was transported to Fermilab in the US in 2017. To ameliorate the impact of shallow depth operation at Fermilab, the detector was enhanced with the addition of a new high granularity light detection system inside the LAr volume and an external cosmic ray tagging system. Currently in the final stages of commissioning, ICARUS is the largest LArTPC ever to operate in a neutrino beam. In this talk I will describe how ICARUS will resolve a long-standing neutrino anomaly that favors the existence of a new, non-interacting, "sterile" neutrino.

     

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Tue
    05
    Apr
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Erika Hamden
    Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory
    University of Arizona

    Building Your Own Ultraviolet Telescope

    Why do galaxies look the way they do? How do galaxies interact with their environments? How does a star form? How does the environment around a new star impact the planets that form around it? These questions can all be answered by observations in the ultraviolet, a seriously neglected wavelength range. In this talk, I will discuss several space and sub-orbital UV telescopes that I am developing to answer the questions above, including FIREBall-2 (a balloon-borne UV spectrograph), Aspera (a NASA funded extreme UV SmallSat), and Hyperion (a FUV mission in development). I will also describe the importance of technology development in enabling these missions and the science they can achieve. Finally, I will argue that the best way to answer difficult science questions is to stop waiting for someone else to build your telescope.

     

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Sun
    10
    Apr
    2022
    8:00 pmKennon Observatory

    We are offering astronomy open houses and viewings with our telescopes:

    • April 10, 2022 on Sunday 8:00 - 9:30 PM
    We’ll be looking at the Moon. The half-Moon is always great!
    We’ll look at the Beehive and the Orion nebula, and double stars.
    The event is free, families are welcome. We ask visitors to have masks handy, and put them on when indoors or when many people congregate in a small area.
    Viewing is not possible when the sky is cloudy - if that happens we’ll have to cancel and ask everyone to come back in about 4 weeks for another try.

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    12
    Apr
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Zhenhua Tian
    Department of Aerospace Engineering
    Mississippi State University

    Leveraging Acoustics for Structural Health Monitoring and Noncontact Manipulation of Micro/Nano Objects

    Acoustic waves carry both information and energy that allow them to inspect material defects as well as create invisible robotic hands (i.e., acoustic tweezers) capable of manipulating matter. This talk will cover my previous studies on leveraging acoustics for structural health monitoring (SHM) and noncontact manipulation of micro/nanoparticles. The first part of the talk is about SHM systems based on laser ultrasonics and ultrasonic arrays for rapid inspection of defects in aerospace structures, such as delamination in composites, disbonding in honeycomb sandwich panels, and corrosion in metal plates. The second part of my talk focuses on dynamic acoustic tweezers based on 10's MHz surface acoustic waves (SAWs). These SAW-based acoustic tweezers use a programmable array of interdigital transducers (IDTs) for the translation, patterning, and concentration of micro/nano objects. Their functions will be discussed with experimental examples, including (i) constructing diverse lattice-like patterns of micro/nanoparticles, (ii) manufacturing composites with patterned carbon nanotubes, and (iii) printing anisotropic tissues with aligned cells.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Wed
    13
    Apr
    2022
    3:00 pmLewis 228 Conference room and Via Zoom

    You are invited to attend John Waite's Ph.D. dissertation defense at 3:00 PM on Wednesday, April 13th in the Lewis 228 Conference room and via Zoom: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/7080349707?pwd=WjB2WlZHajgzSVhXQVVHcjd0eTRyZz09 .
    The dissertation title is: “Exploring the Standard Model and Beyond using B and D meson decays.”

  • Mon
    18
    Apr
    2022
    1:00 pm109 Lewis Hall and Via Zoom

    You are invited to attend Sashwat Tanay's Ph.D. dissertation defense at 1:00 PM on Monday, April 18th in 109 Lewis Hall and Via Zoom: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/93776969564.
    The dissertation title is: “Post-Newtonian Dynamics Of Eccentric, Spinning Binary Black Holes And The Associated Gravitational Waveform.”

  • Tue
    19
    Apr
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Prajwal Mohan Murthy
    Department of Physics
    University of Chicago

    Search for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment and "what next?"

    Baryon asymmetry of the universe, i.e. the fact that much of the observed universe is made of matter as opposed to equal amounts of matter and anti-matter, demands violation of Charge-Parity (CP) symmetry. Yet, the amount of CP violation from the Standard Model of particle physics is insufficient to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. Observation of a non-zero permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) coupled to the spin of any sub-atomic particle, such as the neutron, is an indication of CP violation. Therefore, measuring the neutron EDM, is a key technique of getting a handle on the amount of CP violation. The neutron EDM from the standard model sources is so small that no experiment has thus far achieved the sensitivity required. Nonetheless, searches for the neutron EDM is an important method by which to test and constrain physics beyond the standard model. The neutron EDM has been measured since the 1940s and the sensitivity of the experiments has improved by over 8 orders of magnitude.

    The most recent series of efforts were conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). This was a room temperature experiment employing the Ramsey technique of separated oscillating fields. These measurements used a 21 l storage chamber, in which ultracold neutrons were stored, and surrounded by 4 layers of mu-metal. Prior to 2006, the series of measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) culminated in the measurement of dn < 3 × 10-26 e.cm (90% C.L) [Phys. Rev. D 92, 092003 (2015)] over 5 years of data taking. The ILL apparatus was upgraded significantly with addition of: (i) 16 Cs-133 magnetometers to further characterize the magnetic field environment in the storage chamber, (ii) a new neutron detector system which could simultaneously count both the spin states of the neutron, and (iii) optimized coating inside the storage chamber to maximize the neutron density. The upgraded apparatus was moved to the Paul Scherrer Institute and independently achieved a measurement of dn < 1.8 × 10-26 e.cm (90% C.L) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 124, 081803 (2020)] in just 2 years of data taking. The PSI nEDM experiment has also been a source of rich physics program beyond the measurement of the nEDM. It has investigated neutron oscillation, provided input into neutron lifetime measurements, searched for axions, and tested Lorentz Invariance.

    While the search for CPV EDM was first attempted in neutrons, searching for atomic EDM may be a more lucrative avenue, since multiple sources contribute to an atomic EDM, viz. nucleon EDM, nuclear Schiff moment, CP violating interactions between the electrons and the nuclei, and the nuclear MQM also contributes to the atomic EDM. Nuclear Schiff moment and nuclear MQM are significantly enhanced in quadrupole and octupole deformed nuclei. We will also discuss viable candidate isotopes which have maximally enhanced sensitivity to EDMs.

     

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/91928227187

    Meeting ID: 919 282 27187

  • Tue
    19
    Apr
    2022
    6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Jason Hoeksema
    Department of Biology
    University of Mississippi

    Science and Conservation for Birds and Humans on Working Lands in the Mississippi Delta

    The Mississippi Delta was historically a vast wetland, covered with flooded woodlands, swamps, and oxbow lakes. These wetland habitats provided essential ecosystem services, including flood control and wildlife habitat. Today, most of these wetlands have been drained or diverted for agriculture, which supplies food and represents a key economic base in our region. Is there a way we can conserve and restore the ecosystem services of wetlands, while maintaining sustainable agricultural production? Delta Wind Birds (DWB) is a conservation non-profit based in Oxford, working to conserve existing wetlands and especially to create temporary wetlands on private lands in the Delta, including crop farms. Scientists from the University of Mississippi, the USDA-ARS, and Mississippi State University are partnering with DWB to study how these temporary wetlands may benefit migratory water birds, conserve soil, reduce downstream nutrient pollution, and improve crop yields .

    We are in-person!

    To join virtually via Zoom:
 https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/ 99989536748

    See this page for details.

  • Wed
    20
    Apr
    2022
    11:00 amVia Zoom

    You are invited to attend Sudeep Adhikari's Ph.D. dissertation defense at 11:00 AM on Wednesday, April 20th Via Zoom: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/97399247886.
    The dissertation title is: “Biopolymer Unfolding as a Process of Biased Activated Barrier Crossing.”

  • Thu
    21
    Apr
    2022
    2:00 pmRoom 228 Lewis Hall and Via Zoom

    You are invited to attend Paul Gebeline's Honors College thesis defense at 2:00 PM on Thursday, April 21st in 228 Lewis Hall and Via Zoom: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/96395825170.
    The thesis title is: “Lifetime measurement of the Ξc+ using Belle II Monte Carlo.”

  • Thu
    21
    Apr
    2022
    4:00 pmOutside In Front of Lewis Hall

    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Research Poster Session

    Despite the pandemic, student researchers in the Department of Physics and Astronomy have continued to do some excellent work. In the spirit of scientific discourse, we will be holding a research poster session tomorrow, Thursday April 21 at 4 pm in front of Lewis Hall. Please join us to hear about ongoing research in the department, and maybe get some ideas for a new project!

    The web page can be found here.

     

  • Mon
    25
    Apr
    2022
    4:00 pmRoom 027 Honors College and Via Zoom

    You are invited to attend Wil Stacy's Honors College thesis defense at 4:00 PM on Monday, April 25th in 027 Honors College and Via Zoom: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/94119188931 .
    The thesis title is: “A Performance Analysis of the Belle II Detector.”

  • Thu
    28
    Apr
    2022
    4:00 pmRoom 228 Lewis Hall and Via Zoom

    You are invited to attend Sakul Mahat's Honors College thesis defense at 4:00 PM on Thursday, April 28st in 228 Lewis Hall and Via Zoom: https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/98842249192.
    The thesis title is: “Monte Carlo Study of Lepton Flavor Violation in B Decays with Belle II Simulation.”

  • Wed
    15
    Jun
    2022
    2:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Vojtech Witzany
    School of Mathematics and Statistics
    University College Dublin

    Action-angle Coordinates for Black Hole Geodesics

    Action-angle (AA) coordinates are a traditional tool in celestial mechanics with roots as early as in the works of Johannes Kepler in 1609. In modern terms, AA coordinates amount to a particular spectral solution of the equations of motion of a given conservative system. As a result, they serve as an extremely convenient basis for further analytical computations. I will show how AA coordinates are constructed for black hole geodesics, and how that will be useful in various approximations to the relativistic two-body problem and binary inspirals (EOB, large mass ratio,...).

  • Thu
    18
    Aug
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Hartmut Grote
    Gravity Exploration Institute
    Cardiff University

    Quantum-Enhanced Interferometry for Dark Matter and Quantum Gravity Searches

    Laser interferometry has revolutionized astronomy by introducing a new sense in the observation of the universe. We can now hear the ripples of space-time: gravitational waves. Moving beyond this 'application' of laser interferometry, in this talk I will give an overview of how ultra-precise laser interferometers can also be used to try to shed light on other mysteries of the universe. Namely the search for dark matter and the question of whether space-time is quantized at the smallest level.

  • Tue
    30
    Aug
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Joe Rivest, Madusanka Abeykoon, Devesh Bhattarai
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Student Research Presentations

    Graduate students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy will present brief reports on their ongoing research.

     

  • Sun
    04
    Sep
    2022
    7:45 pmKennon Observatory
    We are offering a viewing of the sky with out telescopes in Kennon Observatory on Sept 4, Sunday night, 7:45 - 9:15 PM.
    We’ll be looking at the Moon. The half-Moon is always great!
    We’ll look at Saturn, which is a great view, and Jupiter as it comes up around 9 pm.
    The event is free, families are welcome.
    Viewing is not possible when the sky is cloudy - if that happens we’ll have to cancel and ask everyone to come back in exact 4 weeks for another try.

     

    See this page for the full schedule.

  • Tue
    06
    Sep
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Sina Rostami, Santosh Bhandari, Quinn Campagna
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Student Research Presentations

    Graduate students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy will present brief reports on their ongoing research.

     

  • Tue
    13
    Sep
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Cecille Labuda
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Spatial Variation of the Ultrasonic Properties of Brain

    Brain is inhomogeneous due to its composition of different tissue types (gray and white matter), anatomical structures (e.g. thalamus and cerebellum), and cavities in the brain (ventricles). These inhomogeneities lead to spatial variations in the ultrasonic properties of the organ. However, reporting on the spatial variation of the ultrasonic properties is limited in the literature. The spatial variation of the speed of sound, frequency slope of attenuation, attenuation and backscatter in brain tissue are presented here as two-dimensional maps. Tissue specimens were 1-cm thick slices of fixed sheep brain prepared from the coronal, sagittal and transverse anatomic planes. Ultrasonic measurements were performed using broadband transducers with center frequencies of 3.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10 MHz. The spatial variation of these properties are clearly visualized and structures visible in the maps are consistent with the known morphologic features of the brain. White and gray matter appeared to be distinguishable in the images. The average values of the ultrasonic properties are consistent with published values.

    There will be refreshments at 3:45 pm in Lewis 109.

     

  • Tue
    20
    Sep
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Jeffrey Kleykamp and Luiz Prais
    Department of Physics and Astronomy
    University of Mississippi

    Search for Non-Standard Interactions with Neutrino Oscillations at the NOvA Experiment

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations provided the first evidence for the so-called Physics Beyond the Standard Model, and opened a window for several and interesting new investigations in the field of neutrino physics. Among the possibilities, Non-standard interactions (NSI) are an extension of the neutrino matter effect leading to a rich phenomenology, and are expected to modify the propagation of neutrinos through matter. The current open questions in the neutrino oscillation model rely heavily on how neutrinos interact with matter, to an extent that NSI could induce possible effects. The NOvA Experiment presents its first preliminary search for flavor-changing NSI in neutrino oscillations in the 810 km baseline as neutrinos cross the Earth's crust between the Near and Far Detectors.

    There will be refreshments at 3:45 pm in Lewis 109.

     

  • Tue
    20
    Sep
    2022
    6:00 pmHeartbreak Coffee, 265 North Lamar Blvd, Oxford, Mississippi

    Dr. Eden Tanner
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
    University of Mississippi

    Hitching a Ride for Effective Drug Delivery

    Can you imagine if only 1% of your text messages got sent to the right person? This is the reality for almost all nanoparticles used for drug delivery, and especially for treating cancer. At this rate, you’d need to give someone a trillion nanoparticles to see any effect, which is not practical or healthy in a person. In our lab, we use a material called ionic liquids – essentially salts that are liquid at room temperature – as our nanoparticle GPS to make sure they get to exactly where they need to go in the body. The ionic liquids are selectively attracted to different kinds of blood components like red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. This results in them hitching a ride on the blood cells, letting the cells do all the hard work! For example, by hitching a ride on red blood cells, we are able to deliver about half of the particles we inject to the brain. This could revolutionize medicine by allowing us to effectively and selectively deliver drugs to treat brain cancer, Alzheimer’s, depression, and many other diseases.

    We are in-person!

    To join virtually via Zoom:
 https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/ 99989536748

    See this page for details.

  • Tue
    27
    Sep
    2022
    4:00 pmLewis Hall 101

    Sadia Khalil
    Senior Data Scientist
    Caterpiller, Inc.

    From Physicist to a Data Scientist: It's Never Too Late!

    I am a senior data scientist at Caterpillar Inc, and I like to share my story of career transformation in the industry after more than a decade of research in the LHC experiments at the CERN. I like to tell you why a data scientist career is a highly desired profession for people with a STEM background, especially in Physics. I like to give some tips on how to build a professional network and a well-composed resume, coding techniques, soft skills, and a strong knowledge of the fundamentals of statistics.

    There will be refreshments at 3:45 pm in Lewis 109. —